Blog

To view blog posts prior to July 2010, click here.

The Memphis Business Group on Health (MBGH) is pleased to make this forum, including all web pages and web sites accessed from this page, available to Web Site users and others. However, the MBGH does not render legal or consultation services, and legal counsel must be consulted to determine any material’s applicability to any specific situation. MBGH cannot warrant or control the quality, accuracy, or validity of the information posted here. Comments posted on this blog are the sole responsibility of their writers. Use of such information is at the risk of the accessing user and the accessing user assumes all liabilities that may result from such use.


C-Sections Too Common in Memphis

Methodist-Olive Branch and Saint Francis-Bartlett are the only Memphis-area hospitals to fully meet the Leapfrog Group's C-section standard of no more than 23.9% of births. Other reported rates for Memphis-area hospitals ranged from 27.0% at the Regional Medical Center to 37.5% at Methodist-Germantown.

 HospitalC-Section Rate 
Methodist-Olive Branch
Saint Francis-Bartlett
Regional Medical Center
Saint Francis-Memphis
Methodist-South
Methodist-Germantown
21.8%
22.7%
27.0%
29.1%
30.0%
37.5%

Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women and Baptist-DeSoto did not report C-section rates due to a mid-year change in data collection systems which resulted in 12-months of data not being available.

Tennessee ranked 24th in the nation with an average C-section rate of 28.3%.

Using C-section data reported by 1,122 hospitals through the voluntary 2015 Leapfrog Hospital Survey, Leapfrog found that, nationally, over 60% of reporting hospitals had excessive rates of C-sections. 

These results mean that far too many women in Memphis, Tennessee, and the U.S. are undergoing a major abdominal surgery without medical necessity.

Cesarean sections carry serious risks of infection or blood clots, and many women experience longer recoveries and difficulty with future pregnancies. C-sections can also cause problems for babies, like breathing difficulties that need treatment in a newborn intensive care unit (NICU). In the long-term, research shows that C-sections can cause chronic pelvic pain in some women, and babies born by C-section are at increased risk of developing chronic childhood diseases like asthma and diabetes.

“This is really about how well we, as doctors, nurses, midwives, and hospitals, support labor,” said Elliott Main, M.D., chair of Leapfrog’s Maternity Care Expert Panel and medical director of Stanford’s California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative. “Hospital staff that support labor appropriately and are sensitive to families’ birth plans are shown to have lower C-section rates overall. If we want to improve this rate across the board, then hospitals must hold themselves to this standard to ensure safe short- and long-term outcomes for both mom and baby.”

Click here to:

  • Read more about the methodology used to determine C-section rates
  • Provide your employees with information to help them avoid C-sections except when medically needed
  • Learn more about how providers and policy makers can help reduce unnecessary C-sections
Posted by Cristie Travis at 2:15 PM

Comments

No Comments yet!

Leave A Comment

Please answer the simple math question below to submit the form.
1 + 2 =

From Our Blog

Say Hello

Please feel free to drop us a line via the button below. We try to respond to every email we receive.

Stay Connected

Join the MBGH community and keep up to date with issues concerning Memphis healthcare.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Feed